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God's Way of Love


In a neighborhood just inland from Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, former computer systems engineer and property developer Alan Miller leads some 100 followers who believe he is the reincarnation of Christ. Members of Miller’s God’s Way of Love also believe that the planet will soon suffer cataclysmic events in which billions will die. Miller, who has made such a prediction several times, only to revise the date, uses the apocalyptic 2012 film starring John Cusack in his online seminars about “end times.” Followers include 68-year-old grandmother Joy Harris from the Gold Coast, who spent 18 years and $100,000 following the American self-help guru Tony Robbins. Asked if she thinks Miller may not be Jesus, she says, “It’s possible, but it’s not likely.” (He says he is Jesus’ reincarnation, and he has persuaded his wife that she is the reincarnation of Mary Magdalene.) Another follower is Louise “Luli” Faber, a 39-year-old neuroscientist who worked at the University of Queensland Brain Institute; she owns the house in which some followers live. Others reside in properties surrounding Miller’s own modest abode, where he appears to live a simple but comfortable life, sustained by donations from followers that allow him to fly overseas on recruiting missions. Miller believes that, by examining traumas experienced in both present and past lives, one can get closer to a perfect relationship with God. Illness, failed relationships, cancer, drug addiction, and more are caused by malign spirits that make us act in “unloving” ways, which distance us from God. He will lead his present flock to God through the performance of good deeds and spiritual exercises. Miller, who grew up a Jehovah’s Witness and was a full-time proselytizer for that sect, had a beautiful first wife, two children, and a business. But his long suffering from harrowing memories of a prior life as the historical Jesus—he literally felt the physical suffering of the Crucifixion—led him to an epiphany at the age of 40 in which God revealed Truths to him. Miller’s philosophy, in the end, appears to be copied from the Padgett Passages, received by Texan James Pagett, who in 1914 claimed to be receiving messages from his recently deceased wife that he recorded using a technique called automatic writing. Former follower Dean Alan Sims began to have doubts about Miller, and concern especially about the guru’s telling some couples, even married ones, that they were not soul mates and would be unable to achieve happiness if they remained together. Other former acolytes say Miller controlled the group by ordering a disobedient partner shunned if the partner did not conform to his wishes. (Sunday Morning Herald, 5/1/13) [IT 4.3 2013]