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JMS Church - Setsuri

Chiba, Japan, police in January raided facilities connected to the Setsuri cult, believing that a female senior member, originally from South Korea, had illegally gained her resident status and then gone on to recruit followers for Setsuri founder Jun Myung. He is on an international wanted list for allegedly sexually assaulting several former female members provided by the unnamed Korean woman. [csr 6.1 2007] Setsuri (JMS)

Police in Tokyo are considering criminal complaints against Jung Myung Suk, the founder of the South Korean group JMS and head of its Japanese arm, Setsuri, alleging that he and other leaders raped female Japanese followers. The victims’ lawyers, say Jung, pretending to conduct breast cancer tests on them, put them under mind control before having his way with them. The attorneys, speaking on behalf of victims’ parents, say Setsuri, believed to have some 2,000 followers, mostly students from elite universities, and other young people, usually poses on campus as a sports, music, or cheerleading club. Those who become involved are eventually invited to a Bible study group. Former members say it practices brainwashing and secrecy. An ex-member says he and others were deprived of sleep, forced to work late into the night, and awakened early to listen to Jung’s videotaped preaching. [csr 5.3 2006]

Jung was a member of the Unification Church, in Korea, before the 1981 founding his own group, initially called Jesus Morning Star Church. He fled Korea in 1999 following charges he sexually abused followers. Members, who live in group rooms but are not allowed to become romantically involved, are joined in mass wedding ceremonies. Sources say Setsuri collects at least 100 million yen ($875,000) annually from followers. The more each contributes to the organization — they are told to donate at least ten percent of income from their jobs — the more recognition [they receive] as persons of “faith.” A former member said he thought Suturi recruited at universities because students “are expected to bring in large donations and help raise the cult’s status as employees [eventually] of major businesses or government entities in the future.”[csr 5.3 2006]

“It’s a typical example of a cult that changes one’s thinking and destroys his or her personality on a systematic scale,” says an official of the Unified Church of Christ, in Japan. Universities have thus far not moved against Setsuri for fear of infringing on freedom of religion. [csr 5.3 2006]JMS Church

“Love Cult” Said to Be Unification Spinoff
The JMS Church, founded in 1980 by a former Unification Church member on Unification Church principles, is reportedly using sex between Japanese college girls and founder Jong Myong Suk as the path to salvation. With some 150,000 adherents in Korea and about 1,000 in Japan, JMS recruits on college campuses through “infiltration” of sports clubs and other extra-curricular activities. [csr 2.1 2003]

According to a Christian minister who helps people leave the group, “Jong has twisted the biblical story of Adam and Eve to deal with sex, saying, ‘To atone for Adam and Eve’s original sin, which was visited on all mankind, it’s necessary to engage in intercourse with the Lord.’ In this case, he means himself, since he claims to be a reincarnation of Jesus.”[csr 2.1 2003]

A former member says that when she had an audience with Suk in 2000, he told her to lie down face upward and then ministered a “health checkup” to “protect her from woman’s ailments.” Six months later she was summoned to Suk, who disrobed her and had sex with her. “It was no different from ordinary sex,” she said. (Mark Schreiber, Shukan Post in Japan Times, Internet, 10/27/02) [csr 2.1 2003]