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LaRouche

Canadian Liberal Democrat MP Simon Hughes traveled to Berlin in October to attend a forum — “Does the LaRouche Group Present a Danger to Society and a Danger to the individual?” — as part of a campaign to prove that former LaRouche follower Jeremiah Duggan did not commit suicide as he ran from the group in 2003, but that he was murdered. [csr 8.1, 2009)

Lyndon LaRouche
Two Wayne State University students, political science and philosophy major Katrina Fenton, and her friend Ed Capps, told recently of an attempt by members of the LaRouche Youth Movement (LYM) to recruit them. LYM members engaged Fenton in a sidewalk conversation and told her that the education she was pursuing was essentially inadequate. The students’ subsequent visit to the off-campus LYM office included reading LaRouche literature aloud in chorus, a tour, listening to a LaRouche radio program, and a discussion of why LaRouche’s approach was the only way to save the world. The LYM people then “pitched” dropping out of school in favor of a special education with them. The two were then driven back to the campus. Fenton says she’s received 20 phone calls in the last month urging her to return. Although apparently annoyed, she is not ready to dismiss the LaRoucheites, saying they are at least trying to reform an apathetic society. . . Journalist Chip Berlet, who researches the LaRouche organization, says that it recruits students, who are attracted to its anti-war, anti-bush, and anti-Cheney rhetoric, as well as residents of inner-city and black communities. “They’re masterful at preying on the guilt of people, if you believe in helping the working classes,” he says. Paul McClung, who was a LaRouche follower from 1978–2004, says, “LaRouche sees himself as God,” and thinks “he knows more than anybody, including his hero, F.D.R.” [csr 5.3 2006]

A former Scotland Yard forensic expert has produced a report, based on an examination of the photographic evidence, which suggests that Lydon LaRouche follower Jeremiah Duggan’s death in 2003 may not have been suicide, as German authorities concluded. Duggan was found dead on a street in Wiesbaden not long after he phoned his parents in Britain and told them he was under pressure and in grave trouble. [csr 5.3 2006]

Boston Church of Christ/LaRouche Youth Movement
Stimulated by the campus activities of high-pressure organizations like the Boston Church of Christ and the LaRouche Youth Movement, officials at Boston area colleges think they might well do more to educate students about the dangers such groups pose. The head of Emerson College’s Center for Spiritual Life says students are too sophisticated to join LaRouche, but also that “It’s always a lurking kind of danger, I admit that.”[csr 5.1 2006]

Lyndon Larouche
Parents Call for Cult Awareness
The parents of Jeremiah Duggan, who was struck by a car and killed shortly after leaving a meeting run by a Lyndon LaRouche-connected group, in Wiesbaden, Germany, have launched a campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of “cult-style” organizations. [csr 3.2 2004]

German authorities ruled Jeremiah’s death a suicide, but London coroner Dr. William Dolman said Jeremiah died “while in a state of terror,” perhaps caused in part, his parents say, by the young man’s realization during a week-long retreat at LaRouche’s Schiller Institute that he, a Jew, had become involved with an anti-Semitic group. [csr 3.2 2004]

Mrs. Erica Duggan said: “We would like to see the establishment of a Cult Awareness Week in memory of my son . . . and that schools and colleges warn young people and students about the need to be vigilant against organizations that prey upon them.” [csr 3.2 2004]

In 1995, the German government decreed that the LaRouche political organization was a political cult, and critics have said membership involves the emotional and psychological manipulation of vulnerable young recruits, who are expected to devote their lives to LaRouche and his warnings of economic apocalypse. (Terry Kirby, The Independent, Internet, 3/27/04) [csr 3.2 2004 2004]

Claims Star Wars Defense Was His Idea
Presidential candidate Lyndon LaRouche says the Star Wars defense was his idea, not President Reagan’s, and that it emerged from a series of meetings between LaRouche and Reagan staffers in the early 1980s. “The most important product of those meetings was my 1982–83 role in conducting back-channel talks with the Soviet government . . . The proposal changed the world,” LaRouche said. (Charles Mahaleris, Talon News, Internet, 6/11/04) [csr 3.2 2004 2004]

Lyndon LaRouche
Recruiting on Campus
Followers of Lyndon LaRouche, who have set up a recruiting table on Sproul Plaza at the University of California, Berkeley, are meeting daily in an office in downtown Oakland. Most of them are college dropouts in their late teens or early twenties — some having severed contact with friends and family. They are dedicated to spreading LaRouche’s belief that the world financial system is collapsing and that he is the one to save it. [csr 3.1 2004]

After attending one of the group’s meetings, UC Berkeley freshman Andrew Lai was asked to drop out and become a full-time organizer for LaRouche. Followers maintain a rigorous recruiting schedule, attend regional conventions and “Cadre Schools” — weekend camps where they study LaRouche and his ideas, which include the notion that Queen Elizabeth II is the center of a drug conspiracy, and the belief that Sir Isaac Newton was a pagan worshipper. A LaRouche organizer says some think the group is a cult simply because it espouses unpopular ideas. (David Cohn, Daily Californian, Internet, 2/11/04) [csr 3.1 2004]

LaRouche
Recruit’s “Suicide” Questioned
German police are reviewing their investigation of the death in March of Jeremiah Duggan, a British student, and Jew, who had traveled to Germany for what he thought was an anti-war conference run by the publication Nouveau Solidarité, only to discover that he had actually joined the Schiller Institute, led by the anti-Semitic Lyndon LaRouche. The LaRouche political organization is alleged to pressure young people to believe in a Jewish-American conspiracy to take over the world.[csr 2.3 2003]

Duggan died after reportedly running into the path of two vehicles. The police assumed it was suicide, but a report requested by British authorities indicates that no autopsy was performed and police took no official signed statements from witnesses, which were in any case contradictory.[csr 2.3 2003]

Duggan’s family says that the 22-year-old was studying at the Sorbonne, in Paris, and that when he learned of LaRouche’s anti-Semitic background he declared he was Jewish and fled the place he was staying with the group. But first, they say, he called his girlfriend in Paris saying he was “under too much pressure.” Then he called his mother, again expressing his acute anxiety and wish to go home. As he was giving his location, the phone line was cut off.[csr 2.3 2003]

When Duggan’s mother finally reached the facility where her son had been staying, and before she learned of his death, she was told first that Nouveau Solidarité was a “news agency” and did not take responsibility for individual’s actions. She was told in a call several minutes later that “Jeremiah had psychological problems.”[csr 2.3 2003]

The Duggan family lawyer says that the German authorities’ investigation “is totally inadequate. Jeremiah Duggan died in very suspicious circumstances. These call for a full and proper investigation,” the lawyer said. (Daniel Foggo, The Telegraph, 11/9/03) [csr 2.3 2003]

Getting Campaign Money
The Wall Street Journal says a good reason to check “no” on your tax return when it asks if you want to contribute to the federal election campaigns is that “perennial crackpot candidate Lyndon Larouche will soon get a check for $840,000. That’s more money than Al Sharpton, Dennis Kucinich or Carol Mosley Braun — all of whom have at least the pretense of being serious candidates — will get.” (Opinion, Wall Street Journal, Internet, 12/4/03) [csr 2.3 2003]