Groups‎ > ‎

Néo-Phare

Guru Sentenced to Three Years for Manipulating Troubled People
Arnaud Mussy, guru of the apocalyptic Néo-Phare cult, has been sentenced to three years in prison, under a law passed in 2001, for the physical and psychological subjection of several followers, one of whom committed suicide (while six others attempted suicide). The prosecution argues that the unrepentant Mussy’s control techniques interfered with his victims thought processes and altered their judgment. (Tageblatt, Luxembourg, Internet, 6/7/05) [csr 4.2 2005]

Controlling Guru Sentenced to Prison
Arnaud Mussy, guru of the Néo-Phare sect, has been sentenced to a term in prison and ordered to pay damages — invoking for the first time the French law of 2001 meant to apply to such cases — for physically and psychologically “subjugating” several people. Mussy has been sought since one of his followers committed suicide and two others attempted suicide. A representative of ADFI, a French cult watchdog, was pleased that the court recognized and ruled on the charge of “psychological subjugation,” a term which is at the heart of the new law. (L’Express, Internet, 11/25/04) [csr 4.1 2005]

Police Fear Mass Suicide
French police have surrounded a handful of members of the Neo-Phare (New Lighthouse) sect where they live in the city of Nantes, fearing that the group may commit mass suicide next month, when the Neo-Pharists believe that that the world may end. The members, including a doctor, a teacher, and a tax inspector, follow the teachings of Arnaud Mussy, who has predicted the end of the world twice already this year. [csr 1.3 2002]

Investigators say that the Neo-Pharist preparation for a “last voyage to Venus” — where Arnaud will be Christ and his twin brother will be pope — is “code” for a mass suicide like that in France of 16 members of the Solar Temple in 1995.[csr 1.3 2002]

Mussy, “a numerologist with a taste for the esoteric,” took control of a “banal” sect called Phare-Ouest in 1997, and preached the coming apocalypse — when only “the apostles of the new world, born out of the final cataclysm, will be spared.” In order to create a “Divine Family,” he separated couples that he judged to be “badly matched,” and lived with them, isolated from other villagers.[csr 1.3 2002]

Police surveillance caused Mussy to move the group to a small village on the banks of the Loire, where one member committed suicide by throwing himself under a car and another tried to kill himself by jumping out of a chateau window. A passerby talked a third member out of the same jump. An investigator says that some members “could not bear to leave their spouses for someone else, and so decided to commit suicide. Other members say that the most fervent believe so strongly [that] the end of the world is immanent that they want to die immediately.” (Susan Bell, The Scotsman, Internet, 9/3/02) [csr 1.3 2002]

Mussy’s mother, in a TV appeal, said: “I ask them to stop all this. These things have gone too far. They could endanger other people’s lives.” And a police officer in charge of “sect” surveillance remarked: “They have gone so far in their delirium that they might not be able to get their feet back on the ground. (Rodolphe Landais, Reuters, Internet, 9/4/02) [csr 1.3 2002]