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Rajneesh - Osho


Former Follower Guilty
Catherine Jane Stubbs has pleaded guilty to conspiring to kill the U.S. Attorney in Oregon in 1985 when she was a follower of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and living in his commune, then being investigated for a variety of alleged crimes. Stubbs, who has resided for the past 20 years in Germany — which refused to extradite her following her 1990 indictment — returned to the U.S. in September voluntarily, without a plea bargain, asking only to be allowed to visit her son in Australia, who is dying of brain cancer. (U.S. Newswire, Internet, 8/26/05) [csr 4.3 2005]

Life as a Child among Rajneeshees
Tim Guest keeps telling his girlfriend of five years that he doesn’t feel ready to have children because of his experience growing up with a mother who became a devotee of the guru Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. She left Tim, when he was four, with his father, from whom she was already estranged, and went off to Rajneesh’s ashram in India. Tim eventually joined her, living for seven years in Rajneesh communes in India, England, Germany, and Oregon. All the while, he says, she was rebelling against her strict Catholic girlhood, seeking enlightenment through, among other things, free love and drugs.[csr 4.1 2005]

Even as Tim’s mother abandoned the consumerist dream, “we [children] fought over Legos and ‘E.T.’ toys.” While she built spiritual togetherness as a model for the world, “my mother and her friends ignored some of the more practical needs of the children under their feet — forgetting, for example, to take us to the dentist or to clip our fingernails.”[csr 4.1 2005]

At ten, feeling very lonely “in a houseful of people,” Tim returned to his father, but “over time, my family’s abandonments accrued into a sorrow that I struggled with for years after.”[csr 4.1 2005]

When he was born, Tim’s mother swore she would not raise him strictly, as she had been brought up. So she let him run free. “At some point, I made a similar vow not to inflict the particular agony I knew — of abandonment and absence — on my children. Even if that meant not having kids at all.” (Tim Guest, New York Times Magazine, Internet, 9/30/04) [csr 4.1 2005]

Murder Linked to Rajneesh Influence
A judge in San Rafael, CA, has refused the appeal of Friederike Kruse that she be released from a state mental hospital where she has been confined since her conviction for disemboweling the housekeeper of people she had met in the group led by Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. The Chief Deputy District Attorney said Kruse has been mentally ill for most of her life and that the murder was connected to her commitment to Rajneesh. (AP, Internet, 2/1/05)[csr 4.1 2005]

New Book on Youngster’s Life in Rajneesh
Tim Guest’s recently published My Life in Orange (Granta, 2004) recounts life as a child with his psychologist mother in several of guru Bhagwan Rajneesh’s residential ashrams in the 1980s. It is a story of a childhood “standing on tiptoes looking for my mother in an orange crowd,” and of surviving “a life of sexual precociousness without behavior boundaries.” The movement was really ‘for adults only,’ and children depended on one another to survive, he says. (Nesta Lloyd, FAIR NEWS, 1, 2004, PP. 18–19)

Rajneesh’s ashram in Poona, India, now called the Osho Meditation Resort, caters to trendy European professionals and holds workshops for executives of companies like Airbus, Mercedes, and Nike. The organization is trying to shake off the ‘sex guru’ image and change with the times. (The Times, London, in FAIR NEWS, 1, 2004, p. 19) [csr 3.3 2004]

New Book on Youngster’s Life in Rajneesh
Tim Guest’s recently published My Life in Orange (Granta, 2004) recounts life as a child with his psychologist mother in several of guru Bhagwan Rajneesh’s residential ashrams in the 1980s. It is a story of a childhood “standing on tiptoes looking for my mother in an orange crowd,” and of surviving “a life of sexual precociousness without behavior boundaries.” The movement was really ‘for adults only,’ and children depended on one another to survive, he says. (Nesta Lloyd, FAIR NEWS, 1, 2004, PP. 18–19) [csr 3.2 2004]

Rajneesh’s ashram in Poona, India, now called the Osho Meditation Resort, caters to trendy European professionals and holds workshops for executives of companies like Airbus, Mercedes, and Nike. The organization is trying to shake off the ‘sex guru’ image and change with the times. (The Times, London, in FAIR NEWS, 1, 2004, p. 19)[csr 3.2 2004]

Spreading Ideas in Nepal
Swami Anand Arun, a 59-year-old civil engineer and disciple of the late Osho Rajneesh, who has established a number of prosperous centers in Nepal devoted to the teachings of the late guru, now plans to focus on starting centers in India. Regarding reports of Rajneesh’s extravagant lifestyle, free sex in his Ashrams, and criminal activities of some of his disciples in the U.S., Arun says: “People thought he was corrupting us. But then, it’s the lot of every master. Even Jesus was accused of corrupting the morals of the youth.” (Sudeshna Sarkar, IANS, Internet, 1/6/04) [csr 2.3 2003]

Accused of Luring Children
“Sannyasins,” members of the Orange People, followers of the movement begun by the late Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh, have been accused of trying to “lure” children as young as 14 to attend a weekend residential youth retreat last December in Byron Bay, New South Wales, Australia. The group, which once promoted free love among members, reportedly has some 5,000 practitioners in the Byron Bay region. [csr 2.2 2003]

The goal of the retreat, which did not take place due to insufficient registration, was to allow people “to support each other, to be unique and real, get high on being alive, express ourselves with intensity and sensitivity, and enjoy creativity.” The Federal Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, who is a local member of parliament, said parents should think twice about allowing their children to attend any retreats.[csr 2.2 2003] 

The Sannyasins live on communal property, run alternative health courses and personal development programs, and publish magazines, one of which features cover photos of naked children with their parents. (Simon Kearney, Sunday Telegraph, Internet, 3/9/03) [csr 2.2 2003] 

Late Guru’s Movement Prospers
A new 51-page book, Osho Rajneesh (Signature Books), by Judith M. Fox, says [according to the reviewer] that the late Indian guru has “an enduring appeal among followers, and that this is evident on many Internet sites, at the commune in Poona, India (which was Rajneesh’s first), and in various of the group’s schools, such as a “multiversity” in Holland. In fact, Osho is being rehabilitated, as memories of abuse in his communes have receded, and he is receiving new recognition in India as well as in 300 information and meditation centers around the world. (Religion Watch, August 2002, 6) [csr 2.1 2003]

Former Lieutenant Pleads Guilty to Murder
Phyllis McCarthy, former head of the late Bhagwan Sri Rajneesh’s Oregon commune, was sentenced to a year in jail and fined $1,000 after pleading guilty to a charge of conspiring to murder a federal official in 1985. In an emotional court statement, McCarthy described the Rajneesh group’s control as “psychological torture,” but nonetheless took responsibility for going along with an abortive plot to kill Oregon’s U.S. attorney, who was investigating the “cult.”[csr 2.1 2003]

The conviction marked the end of criminal cases stemming from the commune’s activities, which drew thousands of devotees to the guru from 1981 to 1985. Most of the leaders fled the country as authorities investigated sham marriages, wiretapping, and the intentional salmonella poisoning of hundreds of people in The Dalles, OR. (AP, 12/21/02) [csr 2.1 2003]